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The Greenbrier Classic

David Bradshaw hits a sand shot at No.18 during the Greenbrier Classic Qualifier "sudden death" round against two other golfers, Garrett Osborn and Mike Van Sickle, on the Glade Springs Resort Cobb Course in Daniels, West Virginia. Despite his hang-ups, Bradshaw earned a spot to compete in the Greenbrier Classic later in the week, along with Osborn, Garland Green and Pat Newcomb. 


Here are some images from my time covering the Greenbrier Classic at the Greenbrier Resort in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. I covered the Greenbrier Classic Open Qualifier in search of West Virginia golfers trying to make their way into the tournament, as seen in the picture above. Then I also got the chance to cover two out of the four official competition days (switching off with fellow Gazette photographers every other day) on Friday, July 3, and on the final day, Sunday, July 5. By the end of the tournament I was a sweaty, stinky mess. I spent many hours (on foot) with a load of camera gear scurrying to and from multiple holes on the golf course following golfers, whose names were continually tacked on and off the leader board. Multiple scattered rain storms forced me to slow down as I weaved in and out of spectating crowds and as I trudged through pockets of puddled water and mud. Don't worry, I took a few moments for myself in order to fully take advantage of the media food room. This was my first time covering a PGA golf tournament, and I certainly hope it's not my last. I'd like to continue learning how to make clean, intriguing images of a sport that doesn't seem to lend itself to a flurry of loud moments, like most do.

 

A view from the No.1 fairway of the tee-off area during the final day of the Greenbrier Classic at the Greenbrier Resort in White Sulphur Springs, Sunday, July 5.

People of all ages attempt to stay dry with umbrellas, ponchos and hats as they watch Tiger Woods finish round two on the No. 18 green during the Greenbrier Classic at the Greenbrier Resort in White Sulphur Springs, Friday, June 3. 

A volunteer stands at the No.18 hole while sporting an official PGA Tour sun-hat during the Greenbrier Classic, Friday, June 3. 

Bubba Watson at No. 17 during the final round of the Greenbrier Classic, Sunday, July 5.

A volunteer holds up a sign that says "It's Quiet Time Down South," as people watch Shawn Stefani on the No.17 green during the final round of the Greenbrier Classic, Sunday, July 5. 

Tiger Woods strategizes at No.12, which ultimately lead to him finishing the hole with a birdie, during the Greenbrier Classic, Friday, June 3. 

People walk past the grandstands set up around hole No. 18 as the clouds open up to provide some sunshine for lingering spectators during the final day of the Greenbrier Classic, Sunday, July 5.

Danny Lee strategizes as his caddie Peter Coleman (right) holds an umbrella over his head during the four-man sudden death round at the Greenbrier Classic, Sunday, July 5.  

Shawn Stefani at hole No.17 during the Greenbrier Classic, Sunday, July 5. 

Kevin Kisner reacts to a missed birdie putt on the 18th hole during the final round of the Greenbrier Classic, Sunday, July 5, 2015.

Tiger Woods bows his head as fans cheer for him at No.18 during the final round of the Greenbrier Classic at the Greenbrier Resort in White Sulphur Springs, Sunday, July 5. 

Danny Lee talks to Jim Nantz from CBS Sports after winning on the second hole of the four-man sudden death playoff against David Hearn, Kevin Kisner and Robert Streb, at the Greenbrier Classic. The South Korean-born New Zealander shot a final-round 67 to claim his first win on the PGA TOUR.

Danny Lee poses with his new trophy after winning on the second hole of the four-man sudden death playoff against David Hearn, Kevin Kisner and Robert Streb, at the Greenbrier Classic. The South Korean-born New Zealander shot a final-round 67 to claim his first win on the PGA TOUR.

Two Months in Charleston

Randy Bennett helps clean up his son Travis Bennett's property, below the hill where his own home sits, after a mudslide, induced by heavy rainfall, caused an overflowing creek to reroute and flood part of Browns Creek Road near St. Albans, Tuesday, July 14. Contractors and neighbors came together to help clean up the washed out area as quickly as possible.


Sunday, July 19, marked the end of my second month in Charleston and my last day working for the Charleston Gazette. On Sunday afternoon, I received word that the Gazette would be merging with the Daily Mail, our direct competitor. These past few days have been a whirlwind, but hopefully once the dust settles the Charleston Gazette-Mail's new resources will allow for more in-depth visual coverage of Charleston, the surrounding communities and the state of West Virginia as a whole. 

I am sharing some photos created for assignments over the past few weeks. I've covered the aftermath of flooding that occurred after countless rain storms hit Charleston and the surrounding communities, which is shown in the first several photographs. I've also shot the Greenbrier Classic Golf tournament (to come in a different post), baseball games, community events and a handful of portraits. I am looking forward to exploring more of Charleston and venturing in and out of all the mountains and hollers that this "wild and wonderful" state has to offer as time goes on. 

You can read more from our company about the merger in the links below: 

http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20150719/GZ01/150729990/1102

http://www.wvgazettemail.com/article/20150721/GZ01/150729890/1102

Here's another article from an outside source:

http://www.wvfocus.com/2015/07/late-edition/

 

The old Gazette and Daily Mail newspaper boxes sit side-by-side on a street corner in downtown Charleston, Monday, July 20. Both boxes are filled with the first edition of the Charleston Gazette-Mail.


A cow from Double G Farm is hauled out of the fairgrounds in Eleanor after flooding lead officials to call for all animals to be evacuated from the Putnam County Fair, Tuesday morning, July 14, 2015. 

Mary King (left), Joey Goldizen (right), and Tim King load a pig into a trailer after heavy flooding led officials to call for all animals to be evacuated from the Putnam County Fair held at the Ernest Page Jr. Fairgrounds in Eleanor, Tuesday afternoon, July 14, 2015. 

 

Most of the animal stalls at the Ernest Page Jr. Fairgrounds in Eleanor are empty after heavy flooding led officials to call for all animals to be evacuated from the Putnam County Fair, Tuesday afternoon, July 14, 2015. 

Madison Ondra, 7 (top center) and her brother, Kevin Ondra, 5, (left) play in the KidSpace ball pond as other children weave in and out during the Summer Fun Day held at the Clay Center in Charleston, Sunday, July 12, 2015. Admission to the museums, galleries and shows were free to everyone in attendance as well as free face-painting, ballon animals and live entertainment. 

West Virginia Power's Elvis Escobar (3) slides back to first base safely as Lexington Legends's Alexis Rivera (21) catches the ball during a pickoff attempt at Appalachian Power Park, Sunday afternoon, July 19, 2015. The Power won 4-0. 

Museum docent workers walk towards the Blennerhassett Mansion before tourists arrive on Blennerhassett Island Historical State Park in Parkersburg, West Virginia, Tuesday morning, July 7, 2015. 

Rachel Molenda, my co-worker at the Charleston Gazette-Mail, with her dog Molly on the East End of Charleston. 

Jay Parkins stands at the pulpit in the sanctuary of Charleston’s Christ Church United Methodist, Wednesday July 9, 2015. Parkins, a native of the Kanawha Valley, recently returned to the area to be the church’s pastor. 

Erin Deegan shows off her prosthetic leg cover, made by UNYQ, Wednesday, July 15, 2015. The California-based company has asked the West Virginia native to model its line of colorful and custom-designed prosthetic coverings. Keegan will be flying to Tucson, Arizona, later this month to model her new prosthetic leg covering for the manufacturer. 

SuAnn Huffman and her sister Beverly Lawerence (right) enjoy a small breeze as light rain falls on the west side of Charleston, West Virginia, June 18, 2015. 

One Month as a Charleston Resident

Anastasia DeMoore, who's name is Danny McNeely off stage, performs for the crowd to the tune of Katy Perry's "Roar,"  during the West Virginia Pride Festival in downtown Charleston, Saturday afternoon, June 6. DeMoore was crowned Ms. Rainbow Pride West Virginia of 2015. 


I have officially been living in Charleston for one month. With four weeks at my new job down, I am beginning to get to know the community and am slowly starting to grasp which direction all the one-way streets downtown will take me. I wanted to share some images from the past couple weeks. I got to cover the annual Rainbow Pride Festival, a handful of court cases, sporting events and much more. I even got to travel to Matewan, about an hour and 40 minutes south of Charleston near the Kentucky border, ride on an airboat and cover a tire river clean-up. The wonderful thing about my job is that I feel like I get to know the area so much faster than if I was sitting at my desk all day. 

A West Virginia Pride Festival performer waves a rainbow flag around while singing Dolly Parton's "God Bless the U.S.A," at Haddad Riverfront Park in downtown Charleston, Saturday afternoon, June 6. 

Ruth Nichols, 16, of Cross Lanes, waits for the West Virginia Pride Parade to start so she can carry the rainbow flag alongside a handful of other parade participants in downtown Charleston, Saturday afternoon, June 6. 

West Virginia Pride Parade participants line up before the start of the parade, including Ms. Pride, Anastasia DeMoore (center) and Mr. Pride, Tim Albee (right), along Kanawha Boulevard in downtown Charleston, Saturday afternoon, June 6. 

Roy Pittman, 70, waves to his family as he is lead out of the Kanawha Circuit Judge Joanna Tabit's courtroom after being sentenced to more than 20 years in jail, Monday, June 8, 2015. Pittman received a 20 year sentence for the second-degree murder of his adopted daughter Brittany Pittman, 15, and one to three years for the attempted second-degree murder of his adopted son Matthew Pittman. 

Father James Kurtz is the 14th Capuchin friar to lead St. Anthony Parish, a Catholic church on Charleston’s West Side, over the last 100 years. He will be the last, as the Capuchins recently withdrew the last two friars in West Virginia, saying dwindling numbers left them unable to support a community in the area. 

Government and Military officials address the crowd before handing out Congressional Gold Medals to six men who served on the Civil Air Patrol during World War II at the West Virginia State Cultural Center in Charleston, Saturday afternoon, May 30. 

Ralph Gibson Jr. slowly hauls a load of old tires, that were pulled out of the Tug Fork River, to shore on a small metal dinghy boat, Friday morning, June 5. Keith Gibson, owner of Hatfield McCoy Airboat Tours, agreed to pay volunteers five dollars for each tire extracted from the river and delivered to the Mountain State Tire Recycling in North Matewan during the tire clean-up on Friday. 

Ralph Gibson Jr. (center) works with Ralph Gibson Sr. (left) and Shawna Canta (right) to clean up old tires stuck in the Tug Fork River, which runs through Matewan and other areas of Southwestern West Virginia, Friday morning, June 5. The small crew said they hauled at least 100 tires on Friday afternoon. Keith Gibson, owner of Hatfield McCoy Airboat Tours, agreed to pay volunteers five dollars for each tire extracted from the river and delivered to the Mountain State Tire Recycling in North Matewan during the tire clean-up.

Peyton Davis and his girlfriend Ashlee Blankenship float along the Tug Fork River as they take a break from gathering up tires from the river, Friday morning, June 5. Keith Gibson, owner of Hatfield Mccoy Airboat Tours, agreed to pay volunteers five dollars for each tire extracted from the river and delivered to the Mountain State Tire Recycling in North Matewan during the tire clean-up.

The Wahama Varsity baseball team pile on top of one another after an exhilarating win against Man High School during the Class A State Championship game at Appalachian Power Park, Saturday, June 6. The White Falcons beat the Hillbillies,7-0.